Tag Archives: Virtual Reality

Virtual Reality. Real Potential.

“Virtual Reality was made for education.” I have no idea who first said that – can I claim it? – but I am sure it has been uttered countless times since and I assure you that it will be said countless times in the future. From feeling as though virtual reality (VR) was nothing more than a sci-fi promise of things to come yet never quite delivered to the current situation in which VR feels as if it is undergoing a true renaissance.

VR AWE 2015
VR does need to be experienced to be truly believed. If you haven’t yet then do try it out.

With the arrival of devices, such as the Vive, Oculus Rift and Samsung GearVR, that are finally capable of delivering truly-immersive, high resolution and, most importantly, non-nausea-inducing experiences that captivate both young and old alike, VR has arrived and the exciting truth is that we are simply getting started!

There are already creative, innovative and fast-moving teams working on sating the appetite for immersive content, with gaming naturally leading the charge, and 360-degree video experiences also offering many their introduction to the world of VR. This, however, is not where VR ends and it continues to excite me to see the educational promise that this technology offers and that pioneers in the field are indeed delivering on. Unimersiv, one such team, refer to the idea that whilst 10% of knowledge that is read and 20% of that heard is retained two weeks later, a staggering 90% of what is experienced, or physically acted out, is recalled. If that is indeed the case then VR, with its power to immerse users in any environment that can be digitally rendered, offers a hugely powerful educational tool. The fact that the big players in the tech arena, such as Google, are now taking VR seriously speaks volumes for how impactful it is predicted to be, and that I believe it will be.

cat with virtual reality gogglesPotential medical, especially educational, applications abound, with veterinary no exception. Whilst my interests in the technology are NOT limited to veterinary, it is an area that I have direct experience of working in and so where perhaps I am most effectively able to postulate on the future applications of a technology that IS, I strongly believe,  going to shake things up for all of us. In terms of medical and science education, for example, work such as Labster’s simulated world-class laboratories, where students can learn cutting-edge science in a realistic environment and with access to digital versions of professional equipment. It may be digital and simulated but that does not diminish the educational power that such experiences delivers. I can see Labster’s technology inspiring a new generation of scientists to develop a fascination for the subject and ultimately help solve many of the world’s most pressing problems, such as the issue of antimicrobial resistance and the drive to develop new drugs.

So what about the potential uses for VR within veterinary? Well, perhaps some of the following….

  • Dissection – Anatomical training without the need for donor animals/ biological specimens. More efficient, with multiple ‘reuse’ of specimens in a digital environment, leading to revision of key concepts and better learning outcomes, translating into better trained, more confident practitioners.
  • Physiology – take immersive ‘journeys’ through biological systems, such as the circulatory system, learning about how these systems work, both in health and disease. Simulation of the effects of drugs, parasites, disease processes can be achieved, with significant learning outcomes compared to traditional learning modalities.
  • Pharmacology – model the effects of drugs on various biological systems and see these effects up close in an immersive, truly memorable manner, thus deeply enhancing the educational experience.
  • Surgical training – simulate surgical procedures thus enabling ‘walk-throughs’ of procedures in advance of actually physically starting. With advances in haptic technologies, tactile feedback can further augment the experience, providing rich, immersive, powerful learning environments. Surgeons, both qualified and training, could learn in a solo capacity or with team members in the digital environment – great for refreshing essential skills and scenario role-playing with essential team members. For example, emergency situation modelling to train team members to carry out their individual roles automatically, efficiently and effectively.
  • Client education – at home and in-clinic demonstrations of important healthcare messages, helping drive healthcare messages home and driving clinic sales, revenue and profitability, and leading to more favorable healthcare outcomes and client satisfaction.
  • Communications training – many of the issues faced in medical practice stem from breakdowns or difficulties in communication with clients or between colleagues. Communications training is now an integral part of both medical and veterinary training and should be extended to all members of a clinic’s team, from receptionists to nurses and veterinary surgeons. With the immersive power of VR and the ability to create truly empathetic experiences, it offers the perfect tool for communications training.
  • Pre Vet School education/ Careers counseling – think you know what it means to go into veterinary practice? Can’t arrange a farm placement but still believe you have what it takes to pursue a veterinary career? Imagine being able to experience a range of VR simulations that guide you through a host of realistic scenarios faced by veterinary professionals, enabling you to make informed career decisions based on ‘real’ experience. It has been demonstrated that those who experience high-quality VR feel genuine empathy for those situations into which they digitally stepped. The power of this for making informed choices about future plans and for challenging preconceived notions about what it means to be or do something is compelling.
  • Commercial demonstrations/ trade show experiences – custom-made VR experiences for showcasing new products and services to prospective customers, creating truly memorable and impactful campaigns. I for one look forward to VR becoming a mainstream component of company presentations at trade shows.

These are simply a snapshot of some of the potential applications for VR with most easily being applied in other, non-veterinary contexts. I look forward to continuing to grow my knowledge and expertise in this exciting area and welcome anyone who shares the same sense of wonder and optimism at the possibilities to get in touch.

Virtual Reality – THIS is why I am so excited

The big issue that virtual reality (VR) faces in achieving mass adoption and truly being the transformative technology that I believe it represents is how to really extol its virtues to those who have not had the opportunity to physically try it out. How do you really sell something that requires users to try it to truly get it?

Being a self-confessed tech nerd I have always felt truly excited by the idea of VR, and also Augmented Reality (AR), and read with enthusiasm all of the reports and promises coming from companies like Oculus Rift. I also knew that pretty much anyone who got to physically try out the technology came away an instant convert. You just have to do a quick search for VR on You Tube to see the countless ‘reaction videos’ from people who donned a VR headset for the first time, from traditional gamers to the elderly and beyond.

I had my first experience of VR when I traveled to California and Silicon Valley in June 2015 for the annual Augmented World Expo (AWE) and was instantly amazed at how incredibly immersive VR was, with insanely rich graphics and the feeling as if I was suddenly physically transported to the worlds in which I found myself in. There is something magical about being able to turn around, a full 360-degrees, including looking up and down, and seeing a new world all around you. Your brain knows it’s not real and that you’re still standing at a trade fair stand, but then, your brain starts to forget that and, well, you find yourself reacting as if you’re actually in your new environment. It’s surreal. Awesome but truly surreal. I am not a gamer but I could easily see myself become one through VR such is the richness of the experience. One of the highlights of the trip for me, and my favorite VR experience, was being strapped into a horizontal harness, with fans blowing air at me and then having an Oculus headset and headphones placed on my head. Suddenly I was no longer hanging uncomfortably and self-consciously in a rig on full display to amused onlookers but was flying as a wing-suit skydiver through a mountain range, able to turn by physically adjusting my body and head position. Everywhere I looked I saw the mountains, the forests, the new world in which I was present. Except I wasn’t. But I had to remind myself of that. Repeatedly. The experience was simply that awesome and that immersive. Unsurprisingly that demonstration won “Best in Show” and anyone who was fortunate enough to experience it agreed that it was totally deserved.

Dad_Google CardboardSince returning from AWE I have kept exploring the world of VR, purchasing myself a set of Google Cardboard googles for use with my iPhone, even introducing my dad to the experience by ordering him a set for Fathers Day. Various apps have been downloaded, from the official Google Cardboard application to rollercoaster and dinosaur experiences, and amazing immersive video experiences courtesy of Vrse, and I have loved every one of them, insisting that others try them out too. In fact, everyone at work has had to hear me babble on about how awesome VR is and have experienced one if not several of the VR apps that I have on my phone. The reaction is always the same: initial quizzical skepticism rapidly followed by complete and utter conversion once the technology is actually experienced.

And so it was that I introduced my six year old nephew and two year old niece to VR during a recent trip home. My nephew is as excited about technology as I am – smart kid – and so was eager to try out the Cardboard. My niece, however, wasn’t quite so sure to start with, protesting as my sister moved the goggles towards her unenthusiastic eyes. What happened next, however, was worthy of a You Tube video all of it’s own.

VR_reaction
These grins are one of the key reasons I am so excited by Virtual Reality

As soon as her eyes locked onto the new, 3D immersive world that had been presented to her all protests evaporated. Gone! What instantly replaced them was the biggest, cutest, most genuine grin that I have ever seen and that still gets me a little emotional even now as I recall the scene. She was experiencing the pure, visceral joy that full immersion into a magical new world provides. Never have I seen such an instant and powerful reaction to a technology before. I challenge anyone to deny that VR is a game changer after witnessing what I did. Such was the power of the conversion and the fun of the experience that I then found myself sitting for the next two hours policing the sharing of my phone and goggles as they both spent time exploring worlds in which dinosaurs roamed, rollercoasters careered up and down mountains, and they absolutely loved the Explorer program on the Google Cardboard app that saw us digitally visit Tokyo, Paris, Jerusalem, the Red Sea, Venice, Rome, and many other global locations, all whilst sat in the comfort of their UK living room.

I am yet to join the ranks of those who own their own ‘high end’ VR device, such as the recently launched Oculus Rift, but that is going to change very soon. I cannot wait to delve even deeper into what is possible with this technology, both from a consumer stand-point and also with a view to creating content myself. The possibilities are indeed limitless and whatever we can imagine we can create and experience through the sheer and utter magic that is virtual reality. Reality will never truly be the same again.

Want to experience VR for yourself? The best, lowest cost way to try out the technology for the first time is to follow these instructions:

1. Get yourself a pair of ‘Google Cardboard’ goggles, many different takes on which can be found online at sites such as Amazon.

Google cardboard
Phone slots in to create a basic pair of VR goggles

2. Download the Google Cardboard app, or any one of the many VR apps that are on the various app stores.

Google cardboard app
The Google Cardboard app is a good one to start with

3. Follow the on-screen instructions and check out of reality as you know it!

A Fourth View on Three Sports

Following on from my recent post regarding Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and their potential impact on our sporting lives, specifically skydiving, I thought I would take a look at how AR & VR might add to the other big sport in my life: triathlon.

Triathlon involves training and racing in three separate disciplines, with races ranging in total distance from super-sprint to Ironman and beyond. Data does play a role in both training and competing, whether it be keeping track of 100m splits in the pool, or sticking to a pre-defined power zone whilst on the bike. I think it would be safe to say that pretty much all of us rely, to some degree, on a sports watch, or athletic tracker of some description, with the required data available for monitoring live or analysing after the event.

AR offers the chance to have the most important and relevant data visible without breaking the rhythm of a workout, adding to the quality of the experience and value of the training or outcome of the effort.

 

SWIM – AR may not be the most obvious technology for use in an aquatic environment but I see AR offering some real advantages to those training both in the pool and open water. As far as I am aware there are no currently available AR systems for use with goggles, but with the advances being seen in the field, especially by companies specialising in athletic applications of AR, such as Recon Instruments (www.reconinstruments.com), I do not imagine it will be long before AR reaches the water.

  • Training data – the usual information that one might glance at a watch for, such as lap count, 100m lap times, heart rate and other such swim metrics could be easily projected into view, thus making such data available without having to break the flow of a swim workout.
  • Sighting & ‘staying on course’ – any open water swimmer will admit that sighting and staying truly on course can prove troublesome, during both training and especially races. Swimming further than is necessary is both a waste of energy and impacts on race time, and having to frequently sight disrupts smooth swimming action, again, impacting energy efficiency and swim time. Imagine having a virtual course line to follow, much like a pool line, projected into view both when you look down (as if looking at the pool floor) and when you do look up to sight, such that staying on course is as simple as ensuring you follow the line? Less ‘open swim wobble’ and a faster, more efficient swim.
Goggles, AR
Important swim data & virtual sight line projected into view using Augmented Reality-equipped goggles.

 

BIKE & RUN – systems do already exist that provide AR for both cyclists and runners, with the Jet, from Recon Instruments, being one such system. A range of metrics, including the usual – speed, average speed, heart rate, power, distance – could all easily be projected in AR. With GPS technology and mapping one could have a new cycle or run route virtually projected in order to follow a new course or how about having a virtual running partner/ pacemaker running alongside or just in front of you, pushing you that little bit harder than you may otherwise train? The limits to the uses of AR in both bike and run settings are really only limited by imagination, with the technology rapidly catching up with the former.

Cycling, cycle training
Augmented Reality data during cycle training

 

Cycling, AR, photo
Capture those awesome training and race moments without even having to look away. That’s the power of AR.
VR in bike & run – living in the UAE training outside in the summer months gets very testing, with any attempt at venturing outside in an athletic capacity after about 9am simply leading to guaranteed heat stroke. As such, the turbo trainer does get significantly more use at this time of year. It is, however, really dull! There are ways to engage the mind during such indoor sessions, from video-based systems such as Sufferfest and those available from Tacx.com, and of course the option of simply watching movies, but imagine how much more immersive and enjoyable an experience indoor training could be if it were possible to digitally export yourself fully to suitable setting. VR offers what even multiple screens can’t – full immersion! Training for a specific race? Fancy taking on a famous route but can’t spend the time and money travelling to the location? VR promises to solve these issues by taking you there. Again, there are companies working on this technology, with startups such as Widerun (www.widerun.com) pushing the envelope in this area.

Jumping into Augmented Reality

Augmented and Virtual Reality (AR & VR) both lend themselves to some very exciting applications in sports, especially those where data inputs in real time can be vital. Skydiving – one of my passions in life – is one such sport and here I shall explore where AR & VR might add to our enjoyment and progress in the sport.

In the interests of clarity, I shall just define what is meant by Augmented and Virtual Reality, terms that are becoming ever more part of normal lexicon and technologies that are set to redefine how we experience the world:

Augmented Reality: superimposition of digital data over the real world, thus adding a layer of additional information or detail over that which is seen in reality.

Virtual Reality: immersion in a fully digital world, such that users experience a computer-generated world as if it were real. Using VR goggles to allow users to see the simulated world, plus or minus other inputs, such as headphones or haptic devices to simulate touch, the principle of VR is to leave the real world rather than simply augment it.

 

Skydiving – there are so many data inputs that are vital to a safe skydiving experience, with the most important ones and where AR offers options to add to the experience being:

  1. ALTITUDE – the most important bit of information for any skydiver. We currently rely on a combination of wrist-worn altimeters and audible altimeters. Personally, I am more of a visual person so having my altitude displayed in front of me in an AR fashion, with pre-set altitude alerts popping up where I simply can’t ignore them would be great.
  2. OTHER SKYDIVERS – one of the biggest dangers, other than running out of sky, in skydiving comes from others sharing the same airspace, especially when inexperienced jumpers are involved. Mid-air collisions can be catastrophic, especially if they occur at low altitude. Knowing exactly where other skydivers are, especially if they are within a certain proximity to you, is very important. We cannot be expected to have full 360 degree awareness at all times – we literally do not have eyes in the back of our heads – and so an alert system that automatically identifies other jumpers in the skies would be a great use of AR.

    Skydiving AR
    Knowing who is sharing the skies with you, in addition to useful data such as remaining altitude, are examples of uses for AR in skydiving.
  3. JUMP RUN & WIND INFO – this would be of obvious use in training new skydivers in the basics of jump runs, winds aloft and the effect on their jump of winds, including adjusting landing patterns in response to changing wind characteristics. Experienced skydivers would benefit from such a system at new and unfamiliar dropzones or to revise core skills and competencies, perhaps after a period of absence from the sport.
  4. TRAINING/ COACHING – AR (and VR, especially for modelling of emergency situations) lends itself perfectly to the training of new skydivers and for coaching experienced jumpers in a range of disciplines. At present, new skydivers receive theory and ground schooling prior to their jumps, freefalling with a coach but then ultimately responsible for their own canopy piloting. Students who do need some assistance currently have to rely on audio instruction from a coach on the ground, who can only assess what he or she can see. What if the student could have the ideal flight path including important prompts for how best to prepare for their landing projected in from of them via AR? Important learning objectives would, I propose, be much faster to achieve and good practices established rapidly. The system could be taken a step further by enabling the ground-based coach to see exactly what the student is seeing via in-built cameras in the AR headset, thus significantly improving the accuracy and value of instructions to the student. Coaching uses could include real-time prompts on perfect body position for certain disciplines, such as tracking, and projected flight paths, to aid in flight accuracy. For example, following an AR line indicating a straight-line course in tracking would enable a skydiver to work on fine-tuning small body position perfections thus significantly enhancing progression in the sport.
Skydiving AR, landing
Canopy piloting and especially landing are vital parts of being a successful and safe skydiver. AR could really add to the effectiveness of training and safety for the sport.