Tag Archives: value

Pain & Perception in Healthcare

Sometimes things happen that just make you want to rush home, fire up the computer and start typing. Today saw one of those events: a visit to a chiropodist here in Dubai.
Chiropody Centre_Dubai“Okay then….” I can hear you saying quizzically. The reason is that it drove home the very real value of experienced, confident healthcare and why paying for it is not something anyone should have any qualms about. I have been suffering, it seems, from a very common ailment, one that affects very large numbers of people, especially when of an active disposition: an ingrown nail. The problem, which seems to have selected my right big toe as it’s victim, started shortly before I headed to the US in 2012 to get my skydiving fix and continued to cause me grief upon my return. Repeated courses of antibiotics from the GP did nothing to alleviate the issue and it was only once I was considering the extreme option of surgery that I reached out to a chiropodist. Boom! One simple visit, a basic explanation of the problem, some accurate trimming and instant relief. Long story short, the issue had recently resurfaced and given that I have a rather big race approaching and do not wish to be crippled for it, or indeed for anything, I Googled ‘chiropodist’ in Dubai and found myself in front of the affable Jorg Stobel, of the Chiropody Center. One look, some even better explanations than before and fifteen minutes of trimming, smoothing, lacquering and general food TLC and I was as good as new. No need for drastic measures such as surgery after all. Awesome.
When presented with the bill of just over 800AED (£140 / $220) I was more than happy to cough up, which got me thinking en route back home about the value of healthcare and some of the issues we face in veterinary.
Why is it that a bill of that amount for what was essentially a fifteen minute appointment feels like good value whereas the same bill presented to one of my clients for a similar appointment would likely be cause for complaint? The answer, I believe, comes down to the simple fact that it was ME who was the direct recipient of the RELIEF that came with the treatment. I felt better, almost instantly, and so the fact that my pain and my problem was dealt with meant that I had a far greater appreciation of the real value of the services rendered. An appointment for a pet is clearly not going to have such a direct, personal effect as when you are the one receiving the medical treatment and so I would argue that the value is not communicated in quite as convincing a manner. What if a pet owner felt the effects of the fever and pain experienced by their cat with an abscess? What if that tooth with the resorptive lesion and tartar was our own, or we could experience the discomfort that our pet felt from it? Would it alter our impression of the value of the services performed by veterinarians and actually lead to the invoices presented being viewed as reasonable, if not cheap? I rather suspect they would. It would make for a fascinating study, don’t you think?