Tag Archives: racing

A Fourth View on Three Sports

Following on from my recent post regarding Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and their potential impact on our sporting lives, specifically skydiving, I thought I would take a look at how AR & VR might add to the other big sport in my life: triathlon.

Triathlon involves training and racing in three separate disciplines, with races ranging in total distance from super-sprint to Ironman and beyond. Data does play a role in both training and competing, whether it be keeping track of 100m splits in the pool, or sticking to a pre-defined power zone whilst on the bike. I think it would be safe to say that pretty much all of us rely, to some degree, on a sports watch, or athletic tracker of some description, with the required data available for monitoring live or analysing after the event.

AR offers the chance to have the most important and relevant data visible without breaking the rhythm of a workout, adding to the quality of the experience and value of the training or outcome of the effort.

 

SWIM – AR may not be the most obvious technology for use in an aquatic environment but I see AR offering some real advantages to those training both in the pool and open water. As far as I am aware there are no currently available AR systems for use with goggles, but with the advances being seen in the field, especially by companies specialising in athletic applications of AR, such as Recon Instruments (www.reconinstruments.com), I do not imagine it will be long before AR reaches the water.

  • Training data – the usual information that one might glance at a watch for, such as lap count, 100m lap times, heart rate and other such swim metrics could be easily projected into view, thus making such data available without having to break the flow of a swim workout.
  • Sighting & ‘staying on course’ – any open water swimmer will admit that sighting and staying truly on course can prove troublesome, during both training and especially races. Swimming further than is necessary is both a waste of energy and impacts on race time, and having to frequently sight disrupts smooth swimming action, again, impacting energy efficiency and swim time. Imagine having a virtual course line to follow, much like a pool line, projected into view both when you look down (as if looking at the pool floor) and when you do look up to sight, such that staying on course is as simple as ensuring you follow the line? Less ‘open swim wobble’ and a faster, more efficient swim.
Goggles, AR
Important swim data & virtual sight line projected into view using Augmented Reality-equipped goggles.

 

BIKE & RUN – systems do already exist that provide AR for both cyclists and runners, with the Jet, from Recon Instruments, being one such system. A range of metrics, including the usual – speed, average speed, heart rate, power, distance – could all easily be projected in AR. With GPS technology and mapping one could have a new cycle or run route virtually projected in order to follow a new course or how about having a virtual running partner/ pacemaker running alongside or just in front of you, pushing you that little bit harder than you may otherwise train? The limits to the uses of AR in both bike and run settings are really only limited by imagination, with the technology rapidly catching up with the former.

Cycling, cycle training
Augmented Reality data during cycle training

 

Cycling, AR, photo
Capture those awesome training and race moments without even having to look away. That’s the power of AR.
VR in bike & run – living in the UAE training outside in the summer months gets very testing, with any attempt at venturing outside in an athletic capacity after about 9am simply leading to guaranteed heat stroke. As such, the turbo trainer does get significantly more use at this time of year. It is, however, really dull! There are ways to engage the mind during such indoor sessions, from video-based systems such as Sufferfest and those available from Tacx.com, and of course the option of simply watching movies, but imagine how much more immersive and enjoyable an experience indoor training could be if it were possible to digitally export yourself fully to suitable setting. VR offers what even multiple screens can’t – full immersion! Training for a specific race? Fancy taking on a famous route but can’t spend the time and money travelling to the location? VR promises to solve these issues by taking you there. Again, there are companies working on this technology, with startups such as Widerun (www.widerun.com) pushing the envelope in this area.