Tag Archives: charity

Run in the Dark (Dubai Style)

Scott and Chris_Run in the DarkWith all of the great races on offer over the sporting season here it is nice to occasionally be able to get involved in an event that has a great underlying cause attached to it and to channel all of that athletic energy into more than just chasing PBs and medals. So it was that I signed up to the Run in the Dark after learning of the event from a new friend and fellow vet here in the city, Scott, and his girlfriend, Sarah, a lawyer here in Dubai.

The run, of which there was the option to cover either 4km or 9km, was one of several being staged on the same evening (in terms of the local start time and date) around the globe, and was in aid of the Mark Pollock Trust, an organisation established by Mark himself following a slew of incredibly unfortunate and ultimately life-changing events, and whose mission is to find and connect people from around the world, and across disciplines, to fast-track a cure for paralysis.

The Dubai ‘pop up,’ as it was referred to on the website, saw about thirty of us don runners, strap on our reflective, flashing armbands and congregate outside the Marina Mall, before setting off on our respective loop of the marina, meeting back at the mall.

Chris and Caoimhe_Run in the DarkI recognised a few familiar faces from the local running and triathlon scene, whilst many more were new to me. What was clear, however, was that everyone was out to have some fun, get some decent exercise and reflect in a positive manner on what is ultimately a very worthwhile cause. Although pegged as a ‘fun run,’ the competitive runner in all of us did mean that this was never going to be a simple stroll and so the pace started off steady, gradually picking up towards the closing stages. Although I ended up running relatively up front, along with Sharjah-based teacher and exceptionally good runner, Caoimhe, there was one member of the group who either had a plane to catch or chilli down his pants because he literally flew off and was not actually seen again once the starting signal was given. Still, the fact remains that he came out for a good cause.

The marina loop is always an entertaining run, as the variation in width and activity around the edge makes for a variable experience. The end closest to Jebel Ali always affords a good chance to really stretch the legs and open up the throttle, whilst the more densely packed areas closest to the Dubai end, with the plethora of packed-out restaurants and tourists casually strolling along, call for more of a Rugby Sevens approach, nimbly dodging and weaving, whilst occasionally having to grind to an acute halt before accelerating on again. The other challenge of this section of the marina are the ever-present dangers posed from those pedal-powered go-karts that kids with F1 dreams (if not the skills) charge through the crowds in, often calling for a deft leap and dodge manoeuvre to be pulled from nowhere. Still, all told, both Caoimhe and I posted a very pleasing 9km time, sprinting home in grand style.

Zero Gravity in DubaiFollowing the run, a few of us piled into Scott and Sarah’s car, flashing armbands and all, to make the short journey over to Zero Gravity where post-run grub and a few well-deserved drinks were the order of the evening. A great setting to bring to a close a really fun night with some great people, all really maximising their time here in this great and ever-changing city of Dubai.

To learn more about the Run in the Dark, including how to sign up for 2015’s events, and to read more about the Mark Pollock Trust, head to www.runinthedark.org.

The Start of the Iron Adventure

It’s official: I am in training for my very first Ironman, with the Lake Tahoe event a little over nine months away. Time enough to cultivate my very own baby of endurance fitness and stamina, such that I actually step up the challenge and avoid wilting on the day. I have enlisted the services of a coach for this challenge as I know that as much as I would like to think I am self motivated enough to find, prepare and actually execute a suitable training plan, the truth is that I am not. That may seem like a startling admission to make but it is the truth and I would argue that those people who can genuinely push themselves to the heights of their innate abilities without any help from external sources are few and far between. I know only a few people who I would describe as being genuinely super self motivated. As for me, I am driven but for an undertaking of this magnitude I feel that having someone I am answerable to each week will be essential and will get me up and out for training on those inevitable mornings or evenings when I am simply feeling like taking the easier option of staying in bed longer or kicking back with a movie.

My coach is a lady by the name of Trace Rogers, who has personally competed in many Ironman events and trained several athletes in the past. As such I know I am in good hands and feel confident that if I follow her guidance and advice then I will turn up in California in the best possible form. The initial period of my training programme is focused on preparing for one of my earlier A races, the Abu Dhabi International Triathlon, which is in March, and is effectively an Olympic distance race albeit with a 100km bike leg as opposed to the usual 40km. The initial couple of weeks are focused more on building a base level of fitness, although I am pleased with my general level of base fitness at present. For example, a couple of friends from the Dubai Tri Pirates and I headed up to Jebel Hafeet, a mountain of 1,249m elevation and a steady 14km climb from the very bottom to the top, with stunning views out over the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, and the town of Al Ain, and the Sultanate of Oman, with which the mountain shares a border. Initially apprehensive that I would have some issues with the climb, I actually felt very comfortable pushing up it twice in a row without having to feel like stopping. This is not something I would have been able to do back in February when I first moved out here.

Other training so far this week has included an early morning run session, focusing on hill intervals, and my very first turbo training session at home. What struck me about turbo training is that it is a) incredibly sweaty, as there is no air flow as you would get outside actually moving forward. It was also just generally a bit weird cycling on my road bike in the house, as I have only ever associated it with going out on the road or track. Still, it’s a great training aid, especially on those rare days when the weather isn’t great, which thankfully isn’t very often.